June 2, 2016

“H.” A Panel Discussion on Harm Reduction, moderated by Sarah Resnick

Detail from Mary Addison Hackett, Seashells, 2014, oil on canvas. 52 × 44". Courtesy of the artist.

A young nurse examines the arms of a fiftysomething woman. The woman looks afraid. The nurse speaks in soft tones as she runs her hands along the woman’s forearms, helps her to locate a vein that isn’t damaged, scarred, or collapsed. The nurse ties a tourniquet around her biceps. They both pause. The woman, hand trembling, inserts the needle. The nurse removes the tourniquet. The woman pushes the plunger.

”H.” —Sarah Resnick, n+1 Issue 24

Building on Sarah Resnick’s essay “H.” in Issue 24, n+1 presents a panel discussion on harm reduction and the future of drug policy. Resnick will moderate, joined by Mike Selick of the Harm Reduction Coalition, Alyssa Aguilera of Vocal NY, Kristen Maye of the Drug Policy Alliance’s New York policy office, and George Carter of Act Up.

The event is free and open to the public.

THE POWERHOUSE ARENA
7 PM, June 2 2016
37 Main St, Brooklyn, NY 11201

RSVP on Facebook

Sarah Resnick (moderator) is a writer and senior editor of Triple Canopy. Her essay “H.” was published in Issue 24 of n+1. She lives in New York.

Alyssa Aguilera is the Co-Executive Director at VOCAL-NY, a grassroots community organizing group that builds power among low-income people impacted by HIV/AIDS, the drug war, and mass incarceration.

George M. Carter is the founder and director of the Foundation for Integrative AIDS Research and has been an AIDS activist since he joined the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) in 1989.

Kristen Maye is a policy associate at the Drug Policy Alliance’s New York policy office, working at the intersection of racial justice and harm reduction.

Mike Selick coordinates the Harm Reduction Coalition’s policy and capacity-building work focused on Hepatitis C. Mike has been a community organizer and advocate for human rights focusing on police accountability, inequality, drug use, sex work, homelessness, HIV, and Hepatitis C for more than a decade.