Series

Occupy Onwards

Introduced by Occupy! Gazette

This series collects our ongoing coverage of the Occupy movement as well as featured articles from the Occupy! Gazette and our book Occupy! Scenes from Occupied America, published by Verso in December 2011.

To read more about and download issues of the Gazette, see the Gazette homepage. The Occupy! book is available for purchase in the n+1 shop as well as your local bookstore; all royalties go to OWS.

For email, using Riseup.net is good news. The solutions they offer are integrated with Tor as much as possible. They’re badass. Whereas Google inspects your traffic as a method of monetization. I’d rather give Riseup fifty dollars a month for the equivalent service of Gmail, knowing their commitment to privacy. And also knowing that they would tell the cops to go fuck themselves. There’s a lot of value in that. More…

10 August 2012

Three officers drove me in a squad car to the Tombs. After learning that I was a fellow New York City employee, they became oddly jocular as they racked up overtime on my behalf. Waiting for an elevator to take us inside, I watched as they emptied the bullets from their guns. “Don’t worry,” Officer Best deadpanned. “This isn’t the execution wall. That comes later.” More…

8 June 2012

The Occupy Frankfurt camp has existed for seven months, directly in front of the ECB. Despite the addition of as many as 5,000 on-duty policemen per shift, entry bans for potential rioters, and the fact that Occupy is a peaceful organization in its declared principles, someone suddenly decided that we were a threat to the business of the ECB and other Frankfurt banks, and a “forbidden zone” was established in Frankfurt. More…

6 June 2012

That was when the full force of the SPVM riot squad—some 100 armed and armored cops backed by the SPVM mounted unit—charged us. Someone up ahead had thrown a Molotov cocktail at the riot line, and now the police were determined to punish us all. Later the police claimed they had warned us three times that the march was illegal and had asked us to disperse. I never heard them. More…

5 June 2012

The next night, at 8 PM, when the music started again, my partner and I took our daughter down into the street. We strolled around the neighborhood, seeing friends and meeting strangers while the music got louder and louder, magnetically bringing more and more people together. Eventually one hundred of us were lined up along St. Viateur. More…

30 April 2012

If you have 300 people against three or four police officers—well, what happened in Chicago was that one group of police officers shot and killed three black Communists involved in this movement. And then fifty thousand people marched through the city in a memorial parade—and after that it became incredibly difficult to evict anybody in Chicago. More…

30 April 2012

When you are wealthy and successful, you have a choice. You can believe your success stems from luck and privilege, or you can believe it stems from hard work. Very few people like to view their success as a matter of luck. And so, perhaps understandably, most people on Wall Street believe they have earned their jobs, and the money that follows. More…

30 April 2012

We have this curious system whereby the US has this gigantic empire, which we can’t call an empire, the places that we occupy are sending us money, which we can’t call tribute so we call it a loan. And we’re supposed to think this is just a problem with the balance of trade. It has nothing to do with the fact that we have this gigantic army sitting on top of them. More…

5 January 2012

Even before Liberty Plaza was raided, many of us were asking what was next for Occupy Wall Street. The movement, we said, was about more than holding a space, even one in the heart of Manhattan’s financial district. Occupation, I often heard, was a means, not an end; a tactic, not a target. The goal, from the beginning, was to do more than build an outdoor urban commune. More…

29 December 2011

For the first five weeks, the Wilmington, North Carolina General Assembly met on benches under a pavilion in Greenfield Lake Park, a public property just south of downtown where signs warn passersby not to feed or tease the alligators. I’d heard that at least 100 people had attended the first GA on October 8. But when I showed up on a Saturday afternoon in late October, there were only six or seven people present. More…

26 December 2011

The New School needed to improve its financial situation and its status, and it was going to do it, like any New York institution, through real estate. They were going to tear down one of their old buildings and replace it with a state-of-the-art gleaming sixteen-story tower, home to studios for designers and artists and laboratories (for whom, no one could tell you). More…

23 December 2011

For five days last month, Tahrir Square felt like a war zone. Half of the streetlights had stopped working, probably knocked out by projectiles launched by the riot police, making the side streets dark except for occasional blue flashes from an ambulance. The sound of protesters beating against sheet metal storefront shutters was pierced intermittently by the whistle . . . crash of fresh tear gas canisters. More…

16 December 2011

The global justice movement—so inspiring and innovative for a time, and based on a sweeping critique of how global trade agreements were undermining democracy, worker’s rights, and the environment—faded quickly after September 11. A planned mass mobilization for late September 2001 against the World Bank and International Monetary Fund was called off when the meetings themselves were canceled. More…

13 December 2011

Announcing a daylong OWS-inspired conference on policy, money, history, and strategy with thinkers and activists. Noon, Sunday, December 18. Theresa Lang Auditorium, 55 W. 13th St., New York. Free and open to the public. Presented by n+1, Occupy!, and Verso. More…

5 December 2011

The venerable radical publisher Verso has turned our gazette into a book, with a fair amount of added material, and we’re having a party at Verso’s office to celebrate. More…

5 December 2011

n+1 and Occupy! Gazette editors will be joining an Occupy Our Homes action at 1 PM on Tuesday, December 6. If you’re definitely coming and want to make sure to meet us, please write to gazette [at] nplusonemag.com, and we’ll stay in touch. More…

29 November 2011

When I got there the signs were already up: “Paternoster Square is private land. Any licence to the public to enter or cross this land is revoked forthwith. There is no implied or express permission to enter any premises or any part. Any such entry will constitute a trespass.” The square itself was filled with police, a few of them on horses. Tourists drifted in and out. More…

28 November 2011

I write this on the day that the UC Regents will meet via teleconference to decide whether to raise UC tuition by 81 percent. They originally planned to hold the meeting last week in San Francisco but rescheduled due to fears of too many protestors. Their fears were well justified. The general assembly at Davis called for a strike on the UC campuses today. More…

22 November 2011

Following the eviction of Zuccotti Park in the early morning of November 15, I came with several friends from Occupy Boston to support the mass day of action on November 17. The earliest, riskiest mass action planned that day was to prevent the New York Stock Exchange from opening on time by blocking the surrounding streets. Protesters were meeting at 7 AM to march from several locations to the Exchange. More…

18 November 2011

Yesterday morning, November 17, many of us from magazines here in New York went as demonstrators to join the call in support of Zuccotti Park and for political and economic change. More…

18 November 2011

I was on one of the wildcat marches north from the park towards Astor Place, and I managed to make it back before they charged the last stand at Broadway and Pine. I think we won something both places. I didn’t hear a single chant about banks, the wars, or austerity, and that was fine. Instead they were about the police about how we weren’t going anywhere, about our right to be together on a sidewalk. More…

16 November 2011

Among the endless, nearly bureaucratic proliferation of working groups at Occupy Wall Street and elsewhere—people of color, sanitation, media, alternative banking, sustainability, anti-racism allies, disability—one stands out for its simultaneous universality and total narrowness. The labor working group, in any occupation, has a very clear and dully unobjectionable task. More…

16 November 2011

Tomorrow, November 17, we march! In anticipation of this day of action—chosen to mark the two-month anniversary of the Occupy Movement—we want to share ways to participate. More…

16 November 2011

This movement has clearly entered its second phase. We may have lost Zuccotti Park, and city government clearly intends to keep us out of other public spaces that we have used to assemble. But the movement is far from dead. We are just beginning. Working groups from OWS have meetings and events planned for the months ahead. They will continue to meet and continue to grow. More…

15 November 2011

“What are they so afraid of?” I had asked my friend when we first arrived at Wall Street just after 1 AM, and as I watched this excessive use of force the question kept ringing in my ears. But the answer is obvious: they are afraid of us. “This peaceful uprising against our sickening plutocracy has them quaking with fear,” a friend remarked, proud and surprised. More…

15 November 2011

A massive police action undertaken in the middle of the night against an unarmed, defenseless, and mostly sleeping group, with the aim of their forcible removal and the incidental destruction of most of their personal property was ordered, we learned, ostensibly in the name of “guaranteeing public health and safety.” Why in the middle of the night? More…

15 November 2011

I believe that when your Officer Cho was leaning on my chest last night with a plastic police shield, to clear room for pedestrians who didn’t exist, pushing hard with a line of his coworkers on a crowd of us, he said to me, from behind his plastic visor, where he could watch us all as if on television, or in his car, so he didn’t have to think, this phrase: “It’s a game.” More…

14 November 2011

The second issue arrives at the office today, with new dispatches from Oakland, questions about relations with the police, arguments about the role of the homeless, and more. More…

14 November 2011

Right before midnight I tuned into the Zuccotti Park livestream. I had been down there earlier that afternoon but I still felt compelled to check in. Though the encampment, with the help of a couple thousand early-rising allies, had successfully resisted the city’s eviction attempt days before, I had a lingering sense that the occupation was something precious that could dissipate or be destroyed as quickly as it had emerged. More…

11 November 2011

The 2001 sit-in by the Harvard living wage campaign had something in common with Occupy Wall Street: neither shut its target down. At Harvard, we occupied the main administrative building, Massachusetts Hall, for three weeks demanding a living wage with benefits for all campus workers. What good is an occupation if it doesn’t prevent the occupied from functioning? We worried about that, but we shouldn’t have. More…

9 November 2011

The question everybody asks, of course, is what’s going to happen next? Will the movement continue to grow? Or will it peak and fizzle out? That’s a decision all of us get to make together. The potential of Occupy Wall Street is clear, but it is everyone’s responsibility to turn promise into real power. It is not up to “them”—some imaginary cadre of diehard or professional activists—to build a successful movement for “us.” More…

7 November 2011

Unable to imagine the past except in the form of costume dramas or to think of the future except in terms of far-off collapse, our era has suffered from a blocked political imagination. For twenty years we flattered or rued our condition as the end of history. But present-day civilization reflects arrangements exceptional in human history—and perhaps equally fragile. More…

4 November 2011

Writers and activists will discuss the situation at Zuccotti Park—what it means, how it’s going, and where to go from here. Panelists will include Meaghan Linick, Sarah Resnick, and Astra Taylor, and the conversation will be moderated by Keith Gessen. More…

1 November 2011

In this special edition of the n+1 podcast, Liz Hynes sits down with Nathan Schneider of Waging Non-Violence, n+1 editor Charles Peterson, and Sarah Leonard of Dissent and The New Inquiry to discuss Occupy Wall Street. The group explores everything from new tactics of resistance to mainstream media’s obsession with sanitation at Zuccotti Park. More…

31 October 2011

“Who are they and what are their demands?” everyone immediately demanded to know. The puzzlement showed how the movement that began on September 17 as Occupy Wall Street differs from the great social movements of the past fifty years. It’s another thing entirely to redefine the American populace at large as an excluded group, cast out from the democracy and prosperity that supposedly form the national birthright. More…

27 October 2011

At 4 PM that day, people who had not been arrested, as well as supporters of Occupy Oakland, rallied at the Oakland public library to show support of those arrested and outrage over the destruction of the camps. What began as a rally and march of about 500 people turned into a march of thousands. We marched through Oakland reclaiming our streets and demanding our parks be returned to us. More…

25 October 2011

New York is this country’s “union town,” with an incredible 25 percent of the city’s workforce organized—the highest percentage in the US. If unions work to animate even a fraction of their broad, diverse membership into concrete campaigns and solidarity work, we could see the issues raised by OWS translate into real changes at the level of our workplaces, our communities, and our policies. More…

24 October 2011

The creation of an archive or memorial, even in real time, does not by itself constitute resistance, and it might be the case that the 99 percenters represented by the Tumblr will be viewed by future historians as the necessary fallen of the age of post-industrialization, the great adjustment, or whatever name they give our present moment of economic and social realignment. More…

21 October 2011

With the help of Astra Taylor (Examined Life; Zizek!) and Sarah Leonard of Dissent, we’ve put together a history, both personal and documentary, and the beginning of an analysis of the first month of the occupation. More…

20 October 2011

We’ve been watching the growing Occupy movements, first in New York City, then across the country and the world with awe, excitement, a dose of skepticism, and then once more with awe. n+1 and several talented associates have put together a quick history, analysis, and documentation of OWS. Now we just need to publish it. More…

13 October 2011

Mayor Bloomberg has ordered the Occupy Wall Street protesters to remove themselves and their supplies from the Park at 7 AM tomorrow. If the protesters don’t leave, Bloomberg likely will order you and your colleagues to forcibly remove and arrest the men and women who have come there to protest the policies, politicians, and financial leaders responsible for the continuing economic crisis. As concerned citizens, we ask you not to follow this order. More…

13 October 2011

Over at National Review Online, my friend Reihan Salam has a post up critiquing my recent piece on Occupy Wall Street. In it, Reihan suggests that the Occupation is a familiar caricature of an American left-wing movement. More…

13 October 2011

SPREAD THE WORD: (Substantiated call) ALL CALL FOR #OWS EVICTION DEFENSE SUPPORT FRIDAY 6AM. City is coming with sanitation crew to clean the park, requiring us to leave. We can come back provided we abide by the (public) park “owner’s” rules. More…

10 October 2011

The tedious transformation of substantive political protest into protest against police abuse of protesters at times can be ideologically appropriate and tactically useful. But unlike student, neighborhood, and even civil rights protests, whose participants generally present themselves as a conscientious minority, the Occupiers’ central claim is that they are the “99 percent,” the moral majority of the nation. More…

5 October 2011

Join our contingent as part of the march against corporate greed and the big banks organized by the Transit Workers Union in support of Occupy Wall Street. More…

5 October 2011

The first planning meeting of Occupy Philadelphia was to be held at the Wooden Shoe Bookstore, an anarchist collective; the day of the meeting, Thursday September 29, 200 people showed up, so it was moved to the Arch Street United Methodist Church near City Hall. The church holds a capacity of 900 people. Last night, at the first General Assembly, there were at least a thousand. More…

29 September 2011

The group here was much larger than the one gathered around Moore, but it didn’t feel like a crowd—people were calm, attentive, at ease. A lot of them were sitting down. In order to be heard, speakers relied on “human microphones”: they’d say a few words, then pause while the group repeated their statement. After an explanation of the assembly process for the sake of any newcomers came reports from working groups. More…

27 September 2011

The group had congregated in Zuccotti Park at Liberty Plaza, a paved rectangle between Broadway and Trinity Place, and looked to be at least a few hundred strong. Instead of a single, unified congregation, there were smaller circles of ten to fifty people, some with megaphones. Some circles had moderators and agendas, others appeared to be more spontaneous More…

27 September 2011

It was kind of nice to be at a protest and, instead of marching and shouting, to be talking about ideas. It felt like the script had changed, and that was a revelation. As 7 PM approached, my friends and I left thinking the cops would clear everyone out in no time. When they made it through the night I began to give them more credit, so I dropped off a bunch of blankets and provisions later that evening. More…

Image: Joshua Boulet, "Tent City."