Archive

American Politics

4 February 2014

Graduate employees at public universities have long been granted that right, but private schools have lagged behind, often struggling against anti-union administrations in addition to being reliant on the shifting internal politics of the NLRB. Now, however, the recent NYU election and the administration’s agreement to remain neutral and honor the results are showing graduate employee unions at other private universities that sustained organizing pays off and that they do not need to wait for the NLRB to act to do so themselves. More…

20 November 2013

Pensioners sometimes get portrayed as standing in the way of Detroit’s eventual solvency. But the current fiscal crisis isn’t the pensioners’ fault. The roots of Detroit’s bankruptcy lie hidden in the rocky soil of municipal bond finance. What sank the city was an elaborate scheme to avoid pension payments, which left Detroit drastically more indebted than it otherwise would have been. More…

16 September 2013

On the southwest corner of 22nd and Arch in Center City is the Science Leadership Academy. It is a proud Philadelphia School District high school, led by education celebrity Christopher Lehman. It was founded in 2006, and its second-story windows display three gold-trimmed placards with the words “Adequate Yearly Progress Two Consecutive Years” written on each. More…

11 September 2013

On the afternoon of May 30, hundreds stood at the headquarters of the Philadelphia School District to protest the worst school budget in Philadelphia history. The press had already taken to calling it a “doomsday budget,” a seriocomic term that obscured as much as it expressed. More…

12 August 2013

On the day of the second action, M. and I walked to the 3 train at Franklin Avenue. It’s sunny and cold and there’s no evidence of last weekend’s snowstorm. M. is planning on getting arrested. When we get to the corner of Rockaway and Livonia, we see a reporter from News 12 setting up her camera in front of the Tilden Projects, also known as the pink houses. More…

26 June 2013

Legalization would implicate all citizens in a public commitment to respect and support same-sex couples…The coercive aspect of legalization is a feature, not a bug: change in the law will gradually change the way Americans understand their moral obligations to gay and lesbian fellow-citizens, and the way the nation thinks about sexuality altogether. There is nothing special about same-sex marriage in this regard. More…

17 June 2013

The law created the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which since its founding has been located in a windowless, locked room in the Department of Justice building. Composed of federal judges appointed by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, FISC is a secret court; its proceedings deal almost exclusively with matters of national security targeting “foreign powers.” More…

5 June 2013

Ephemerisle was its own little beehive of decadence, a floating pillow fort saturated in sex and soft drugs. It billed itself as a “gathering of people interested in the possibility of permanent experimental ocean communities,” but felt more like Burning Man, if Burners frolicked in the tears of Ludwig Von Mises. More…

29 March 2013

The n+1 podcast shares a recording of “Debt: Student, Housing, Historical,” the last of four panels at a daylong conference about the ongoing Occupy movement, Occupy Onwards. It featured David Graeber, author of Debt: The First 5,000 Years, Mike Konczal of the Roosevelt Institute, and Brian Kalkbrenner of Occupy Student Debt, and was moderated by Sarah Jaffe of Alternet. More…

18 March 2013

Kansas wasn’t always this way. Until World War I, the state was a hotbed of radicalism: it produced figures such as John Brown and Mary Lease, and was a major base of operations for the Populist and Socialist movements. It is only since the 1990s that Kansas has become associated with a long row of reactionary ideas, leading many commentators to argue that the state took an abrupt right turn. More…

1 March 2013

The n+1 podcast shares a recording of “Foreclosures and Resistance,” the third of four panels at a daylong conference about the ongoing Occupy movement, Occupy Onwards. More…

15 February 2013

The second episode to the latest installment of the n+1 podcast, “Lessons From The Past/Possible Futures,” is the second of four panels from the Occupy Onwards conference last December. It featured Ann Snitow of The New School, L.A. Kauffman of the Global Justice Movement, and Yotam Marom of the OW Direct Action WG, and was moderated by Asher Dupuy-Spencer of the OWS Labor OG and CUNY Grad Center. More…

6 February 2013

Senior editor Christopher Glazek and Sean Monahan presented their pamphlet “Certainty of Hopelessness: A Primer on Discharging Student Debt” at the LA Art Book Fair last week. We’ve shared the introduction and a link to download the book. Chris writes that it’s “deliberately shameless, and encourages debtors to ‘think strategically’ — and often, to lie.” More…

23 January 2013

Tonight, editors and letter writers will read selections from The Trouble is the Banks: Letters to Wall Street, the latest small book from n+1, at St. Mark’s Bookshop in New York. For the occasion, we’re sharing a few of those letters here. More…

23 November 2012

For the small, longstanding music venues on the eastern edge of downtown—places like Mohawk and Emo’s, which helped establish Austin’s international reputation for live music—rising property taxes and the encroachment of high-rise condos mean the beginning of the end. The tension between the music scene and high-rise development is growing in the Live Music Capital. More…

16 November 2012

Manocchio’s prosecution seemed to me representative of the city’s recent transformation. In order to transform itself into an up-and-coming arts mecca and a good place to meet singles, Providence first had to shed its old reputation—of being a corrupt and dying city and a good place to meet mobsters. More…

5 November 2012

Voting is what it is: not nothing, not everything. Think of it this way: if Obama represents the sum-total of left institutional power in this country, then his failures can much more productively be seen as our own. This is depressing in the short term but empowering in the long. Whatever happens on Tuesday, don’t mourn—organize. More…

10 September 2012

According to Adorno, in psychoanalysis only the exaggerations are true. If you wished to characterize the Democrats and the Republicans in terms of true exaggerations, you might say that the Republicans have become the Party of Psychosis while the Democrats have become the Party of Neurosis. More…

Originally published in Issue 15: Amnesty

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10 August 2012

Three officers drove me in a squad car to the Tombs. After learning that I was a fellow New York City employee, they became oddly jocular as they racked up overtime on my behalf. Waiting for an elevator to take us inside, I watched as they emptied the bullets from their guns. “Don’t worry,” Officer Best deadpanned. “This isn’t the execution wall. That comes later.” More…

2 July 2012

Too many women find themselves isolated in their experiences of prejudice, left to whittle offenses down in their minds to nothing worth complaining about — to accept each experience as “a fluke,” in the words of one Wal-Mart supervisor in Alabama, who told deli manager Gretchen Adams that there was nothing he could do about a sexist pay discrepancy. More…

15 May 2012

Maple Shade is a place that is pleased with its small-mindedness. It was and is a working-to-middle class town, proud of its outsider status as a blue collar island in a sea of richer towns: Cherry Hill, Moorestown, Haddonfield. “There’s a carload of people from Cinnaminson at the custard stand,” somebody would say while sledding on a hill. “Let’s help beat the shit out of them!” More…

30 April 2012

If you have 300 people against three or four police officers—well, what happened in Chicago was that one group of police officers shot and killed three black Communists involved in this movement. And then fifty thousand people marched through the city in a memorial parade—and after that it became incredibly difficult to evict anybody in Chicago. More…

30 April 2012

When you are wealthy and successful, you have a choice. You can believe your success stems from luck and privilege, or you can believe it stems from hard work. Very few people like to view their success as a matter of luck. And so, perhaps understandably, most people on Wall Street believe they have earned their jobs, and the money that follows. More…

21 February 2012

Goldstein argues that by keeping their kids at home, parents passively reinforce social segregation. I have sympathy for this view. But, truth be told, the minuscule number of secular home learners nationwide is dwarfed by the huge population of liberal parents who do everything in their power to get their kids into the best public schools. More…

8 February 2012

Before drifting off to sleep, I would read articles about the trial. One strategy of the prosecution was to let the plaintiffs themselves—their personalities, their histories—make a fresh case for the ability of homosexuals to form successful unions. The two halves of the male couple, Zarrillo and Katami, were affable and settled. Zarrillo had grown up in suburban New Jersey and attended the local high school. More…

26 January 2012

From 1980 to 2007, the number of prisoners held in the United States quadrupled to 2.3 million, with an additional 5 million on probation or parole. What Ayn Rand once called the “freest, noblest country in the history of the world” is now the most incarcerated,and the second-most incarcerated country in history, just barely edged out by Stalin’s Soviet Union. More…

17 January 2012

The first sign of trouble was a tweet: [at]mcduh: [at]questlove sayin he saw hundreds of riot cops on South St, Manhattan bout 1hr ago. #occupywallst [at]DiceyTroop are yall aware of anything? I immediately crossed Broadway on the south side of Liberty, side-stepping dormant traces of ongoing street maintenance and responding: [at]mcduh [at]questlove all quiet at the Park. What did you see questo? Maybe Batman stuff? More…

5 January 2012

Even before Liberty Plaza was raided, many of us were asking what was next for Occupy Wall Street. The movement, we said, was about more than holding a space, even one in the heart of Manhattan’s financial district. Occupation, I often heard, was a means, not an end; a tactic, not a target. The goal, from the beginning, was to do more than build an outdoor urban commune. More…

29 December 2011

For the first five weeks, the Wilmington, North Carolina General Assembly met on benches under a pavilion in Greenfield Lake Park, a public property just south of downtown where signs warn passersby not to feed or tease the alligators. I’d heard that at least 100 people had attended the first GA on October 8. But when I showed up on a Saturday afternoon in late October, there were only six or seven people present. More…

26 December 2011

The New School needed to improve its financial situation and its status, and it was going to do it, like any New York institution, through real estate. They were going to tear down one of their old buildings and replace it with a state-of-the-art gleaming sixteen-story tower, home to studios for designers and artists and laboratories (for whom, no one could tell you). More…

28 November 2011

I write this on the day that the UC Regents will meet via teleconference to decide whether to raise UC tuition by 81 percent. They originally planned to hold the meeting last week in San Francisco but rescheduled due to fears of too many protestors. Their fears were well justified. The general assembly at Davis called for a strike on the UC campuses today. More…

22 November 2011

Following the eviction of Zuccotti Park in the early morning of November 15, I came with several friends from Occupy Boston to support the mass day of action on November 17. The earliest, riskiest mass action planned that day was to prevent the New York Stock Exchange from opening on time by blocking the surrounding streets. Protesters were meeting at 7 AM to march from several locations to the Exchange. More…

18 November 2011

I was on one of the wildcat marches north from the park towards Astor Place, and I managed to make it back before they charged the last stand at Broadway and Pine. I think we won something both places. I didn’t hear a single chant about banks, the wars, or austerity, and that was fine. Instead they were about the police about how we weren’t going anywhere, about our right to be together on a sidewalk. More…

16 November 2011

Among the endless, nearly bureaucratic proliferation of working groups at Occupy Wall Street and elsewhere—people of color, sanitation, media, alternative banking, sustainability, anti-racism allies, disability—one stands out for its simultaneous universality and total narrowness. The labor working group, in any occupation, has a very clear and dully unobjectionable task. More…

16 November 2011

This movement has clearly entered its second phase. We may have lost Zuccotti Park, and city government clearly intends to keep us out of other public spaces that we have used to assemble. But the movement is far from dead. We are just beginning. Working groups from OWS have meetings and events planned for the months ahead. They will continue to meet and continue to grow. More…

16 November 2011

The right, very simply, wants us out of America’s public life: the First Amendment may protect our right to rant, but only if we can do it without money and without space. These essays, then, come from New York: the real and imagined city where feminist sexual liberationists, rootless cosmopolitan Jews, not nice girls/boys/others, loudmouth exiles of all colors are an integral and conspicuous part of the landscape. More…

15 November 2011

“What are they so afraid of?” I had asked my friend when we first arrived at Wall Street just after 1 AM, and as I watched this excessive use of force the question kept ringing in my ears. But the answer is obvious: they are afraid of us. “This peaceful uprising against our sickening plutocracy has them quaking with fear,” a friend remarked, proud and surprised. More…

15 November 2011

A massive police action undertaken in the middle of the night against an unarmed, defenseless, and mostly sleeping group, with the aim of their forcible removal and the incidental destruction of most of their personal property was ordered, we learned, ostensibly in the name of “guaranteeing public health and safety.” Why in the middle of the night? More…

15 November 2011

I believe that when your Officer Cho was leaning on my chest last night with a plastic police shield, to clear room for pedestrians who didn’t exist, pushing hard with a line of his coworkers on a crowd of us, he said to me, from behind his plastic visor, where he could watch us all as if on television, or in his car, so he didn’t have to think, this phrase: “It’s a game.” More…

14 November 2011

Right before midnight I tuned into the Zuccotti Park livestream. I had been down there earlier that afternoon but I still felt compelled to check in. Though the encampment, with the help of a couple thousand early-rising allies, had successfully resisted the city’s eviction attempt days before, I had a lingering sense that the occupation was something precious that could dissipate or be destroyed as quickly as it had emerged. More…

11 November 2011

The 2001 sit-in by the Harvard living wage campaign had something in common with Occupy Wall Street: neither shut its target down. At Harvard, we occupied the main administrative building, Massachusetts Hall, for three weeks demanding a living wage with benefits for all campus workers. What good is an occupation if it doesn’t prevent the occupied from functioning? We worried about that, but we shouldn’t have. More…

9 November 2011

The question everybody asks, of course, is what’s going to happen next? Will the movement continue to grow? Or will it peak and fizzle out? That’s a decision all of us get to make together. The potential of Occupy Wall Street is clear, but it is everyone’s responsibility to turn promise into real power. It is not up to “them”—some imaginary cadre of diehard or professional activists—to build a successful movement for “us.” More…

1 November 2011

In this special edition of the n+1 podcast, Liz Hynes sits down with Nathan Schneider of Waging Non-Violence, n+1 editor Charles Peterson, and Sarah Leonard of Dissent and The New Inquiry to discuss Occupy Wall Street. The group explores everything from new tactics of resistance to mainstream media’s obsession with sanitation at Zuccotti Park. More…

31 October 2011

“Who are they and what are their demands?” everyone immediately demanded to know. The puzzlement showed how the movement that began on September 17 as Occupy Wall Street differs from the great social movements of the past fifty years. It’s another thing entirely to redefine the American populace at large as an excluded group, cast out from the democracy and prosperity that supposedly form the national birthright. More…

27 October 2011

At 4 PM that day, people who had not been arrested, as well as supporters of Occupy Oakland, rallied at the Oakland public library to show support of those arrested and outrage over the destruction of the camps. What began as a rally and march of about 500 people turned into a march of thousands. We marched through Oakland reclaiming our streets and demanding our parks be returned to us. More…

25 October 2011

New York is this country’s “union town,” with an incredible 25 percent of the city’s workforce organized—the highest percentage in the US. If unions work to animate even a fraction of their broad, diverse membership into concrete campaigns and solidarity work, we could see the issues raised by OWS translate into real changes at the level of our workplaces, our communities, and our policies. More…

24 October 2011

The creation of an archive or memorial, even in real time, does not by itself constitute resistance, and it might be the case that the 99 percenters represented by the Tumblr will be viewed by future historians as the necessary fallen of the age of post-industrialization, the great adjustment, or whatever name they give our present moment of economic and social realignment. More…

10 October 2011

The tedious transformation of substantive political protest into protest against police abuse of protesters at times can be ideologically appropriate and tactically useful. But unlike student, neighborhood, and even civil rights protests, whose participants generally present themselves as a conscientious minority, the Occupiers’ central claim is that they are the “99 percent,” the moral majority of the nation. More…

5 October 2011

The first planning meeting of Occupy Philadelphia was to be held at the Wooden Shoe Bookstore, an anarchist collective; the day of the meeting, Thursday September 29, 200 people showed up, so it was moved to the Arch Street United Methodist Church near City Hall. The church holds a capacity of 900 people. Last night, at the first General Assembly, there were at least a thousand. More…

29 September 2011

The group here was much larger than the one gathered around Moore, but it didn’t feel like a crowd—people were calm, attentive, at ease. A lot of them were sitting down. In order to be heard, speakers relied on “human microphones”: they’d say a few words, then pause while the group repeated their statement. After an explanation of the assembly process for the sake of any newcomers came reports from working groups. More…

27 September 2011

The group had congregated in Zuccotti Park at Liberty Plaza, a paved rectangle between Broadway and Trinity Place, and looked to be at least a few hundred strong. Instead of a single, unified congregation, there were smaller circles of ten to fifty people, some with megaphones. Some circles had moderators and agendas, others appeared to be more spontaneous More…

27 September 2011

It was kind of nice to be at a protest and, instead of marching and shouting, to be talking about ideas. It felt like the script had changed, and that was a revelation. As 7 PM approached, my friends and I left thinking the cops would clear everyone out in no time. When they made it through the night I began to give them more credit, so I dropped off a bunch of blankets and provisions later that evening. More…

9 September 2011

If you are a US citizen born when I was, in the winter of 1984, soldiers have been deployed on your behalf in every year of your life. Not just in Somalia, Iraq, Afghanistan—but in every region, on every continent, from Germany to Colombia to South Korea. Are we always at war? Depends on your definition, sure, and a tour in Italy is not the same as a tour in the Korengal Valley. But we are not a nation of pacifists. More…

24 August 2011

At the end of the night of Wisconsin’s first round of recall elections, now some two weeks ago, liberal heads were hanging low. Democrats needed to take back three seats in order to regain control of the State Senate. That they would win two of those seats, those held by Dan Kapanke and Randy Hopper, was all but given. Possibilities for winning back the critical third seat, though, were limited to District 8. More…

19 August 2011

A family in the Powhatan collected Joseph Cornell boxes, which my mother once took Lucy and me to see. Lining a dark dining room, the boxes held frightening arrangements of clock faces, newspaper cuttings, and birds, which I was afraid might start moving. Looking at the boxes was like listening to adults talk to each other, overhearing some words I couldn’t understand, but whose feeling I could begin to guess at. More…

17 August 2011

The April 2008 issue of Forbes included Seattle in its list of “recession-proof” cities, citing manufacturing growth and declining unemployment. Amazon and Microsoft were still hiring. But that May something strange happened—with three new condo buildings in progress in South Lake Union, Vulcan rolled out an incentive program, offering to pay part of the closing cost for current renters who’d like to buy. More…

8 August 2011

I was born in 1986 in Mt. Auburn, an old annexed suburb just up the hill from Over-the-Rhine, and for the eleven years I lived there I was the only white kid on the street. It was the kind of street white Cincinnatians patronizingly call “black middle class“—as though if you’re black in Cincinnati, and you live in a neighborhood where only 25 percent of the population lives below the poverty line, you’re doing pretty well. More…

5 August 2011

In my parents’ eyes, founding a feminist club at my school had made feminism the x factor that would get me into a good college, which meant that when I told them I was going to sleep at P.’s house because it was the twentieth anniversary of Roe v. Wade and Operation Rescue was hitting DC’s abortion clinics at 6 in the morning and we had to be there first to keep the clinics open, they had to let me go, because feminism was my thing. More…

1 August 2011

Almost all the added debt since 2000 can be traced to policies enacted under the cover of post-September 11th nationalism; these policies cemented the transition from neoliberalism to full-blown neoconservatism. While preaching the beauty of small government, neoliberals and conservatives redistributed wealth upwards by expanding the government’s reach. More…

11 July 2011

Here’s a statistic: upwards of 60,000 Vietnam veterans are believed to have killed themselves since the end of the war. That’s more than the number of Americans who died in the war—think of the size of Maya Lin’s memorial, then double it, and you’ll have an idea of what it means. But then, that number is unconfirmed, and possibly quite low. The number of veteran suicides, like all things related to the Vietnam war, is a point of contention. More…

1 July 2011

For the last few years I’ve been seeing woodsmen on my city’s streets. They wear long beards and long hair, or long beards and no hair. They favor beat-up leather boots and wool beanies and jobs involving wood. At Best Made Co., they purchase hand-painted axes and canvas portage packs. At APC, they try on pieces by Carhartt that have been recut for slimmer legs and thicker wallets. More…

27 May 2011

The Cone Mills White Oak denim factory sits out past the college football stadium and baseball diamonds on the nether edge of downtown Greensboro, North Carolina. Named for a large tree on the property, it is bordered by narrow, numbered streets cluttered with eyeless and empty ranch-style houses that seem to clamor up to the factory gates, dusty “for rent” signs swaying in their freshly seeded front yards. More…

26 May 2011

M is a journalist in Kentucky who went through a nasty divorce a few years back. She was drinking white wine in those days and coping with an abusive ex-husband but she pulled herself together, went through rehab, and raised two kids who adore her. The kids are out of the house now, and M is six years sober. She lives alone in a small town along the I-75 corridor just south of Cincinnati. More…

24 May 2011

I spent most of my teenage years in Wauwatosa, one of Milwaukee’s oldest suburbs. In the 1960s, at the height of the city’s civil rights struggle, it was one of the hotbeds of racist resistance: when Father Groppi led a protest march into the town, he was met by Klansmen and other onlookers who waved signs reading “Keep Tosa White.” By the early 2000s, such explicit racism was rarely seen. More…

23 May 2011

The funeral came off without a hitch, in spite of the snow. It was as dignified as we could have hoped for and no one from the altar mentioned what had happened. I parked my rental car on Argyle Avenue, feeling a bit more alert than usual. In Atlanta, just after Thanksgiving, two gunmen robbed me of my station wagon and wallet; two days before Christmas I didn’t want to invite fate’s wrath a second time. I was back home in Baltimore. More…

23 May 2011

Americans have always been suspicious of our cities. Before the Civil War, writers competed to denounce them in the strongest possible terms, culminating in the twin Transcendentalist broadsides of Emerson’s Nature and Thoreau’s Walden. The latter prompted Henry James, himself no fan of the city, to describe its author as an “essentially sylvan personage.” More…

28 February 2011

My parents returned to Milwaukee early last Tuesday after spending six days at my aunt and uncle’s condo in Hollywood, Florida. My parents aren’t wealthy enough to buy their own Florida condo—and they probably wouldn’t buy a condo in Hollywood, Florida if they had that kind of money, anyway—but they do, after a combined sixty years working in public education, have enough money and security to head down there on a whim. More…

23 February 2011

On Tuesday, thousands of pro-union protesters in Ohio joined former Governor Ted Strickland and traveled to Columbus, the state capital, where the legislature plans new hearings on a bill that would end collective bargaining for state workers and dramatically reduce bargaining power for local workers, including public school teachers, police officers, and firefighters. More…

18 January 2011

I arrived at the plant around 11:30 on Sunday, hoping to see the Arkansans. When I walked into the press shop, I didn’t see a soul. The fire in the basket above 2-line was nearly out— a clue in itself as to how many people might be about. The Budd plant must have been one of the few places on earth where fire’s presence or absence was still a predictor of human habitation. More…

1 November 2010

“American government is run by and for capital and capitalists. Most Americans hate government. Most Americans love capitalism and capitalists.” A special election syllogism from n+1 and some favorites from our politics archives on Barack Obama, Sarah Palin, swing voters, and election memories. More…

28 October 2010

This is my love letter to state of things in southern Afghanistan, composed in the name of preempting the fraudulent onset of post-traumatic stress disorder. And also written because I want to write it. That, I’m coming around to believe, is a crucial distinction between falling prey to the disorder and appropriating its causes constructively. I think it comes down to control and poise. But who knows. More…

25 October 2010

One begins to think of race in Obama’s America like sex in some caricature of Freud’s Vienna: simultaneously the main theme of all conversation, and the one that can’t be mentioned. Instead of being “overcome,” historic American racism against nonwhite people has gone into deep cover and, with the irrefutable illogic of the unconscious, emerged as a newfangled American antiracism for the protection of white people. More…

8 September 2010

People in Bayou La Batre will talk to you about the oil spill, but they’d rather show you the high water mark in their oyster shop, their pool hall, or their home. The dramatic visibility of Hurricane Katrina makes it easier to talk about, easier to internalize than the BP oil spill. Next to newly built houses you find FEMA trailers, now used for storage. More…

12 August 2010

For months my friend John had been promising to treat me to an epic Detroit bar crawl. When we finally got together one Saturday night in July, John announced that he was taking me to Club Thunderbolt. It was a strip club a guy named Jay ran out of his dead parents’ house, in one of the worst neighborhoods in the city. More…

6 April 2010

The government report is admirably lucid and bears a formidable textual apparatus, including 115 pages of endnotes. But it lacks an index. To remedy this, and following the cue of n+1 friend Caleb Crain, we have assembled a team of indexers. More…

15 December 2009

Earlier this fall, as part of its “New New York Intellectuals” series at Eugene Lang College, n+1 hosted a discussion with young conservative writers Ross Douthat and Reihan Salaam. Listen now from your safe, undisclosed location as n+1 tries to find out who’s right, who’s Right, and why! More…

11 May 2009

I didn’t join the Peace Corps to “save the world,” and I had few pretensions of engaging in major community-changing development. I did expect to work toward the long-term development of school #2’s educational program—this seemed to be ingrained in Peace Corps Turkmenistan’s goals for its TOEFL program. More…

14 November 2008

Throughout his marathon campaign Barack Obama managed to manifest a number of moments of radical privacy that, it seemed, had nothing at all to do with escaping the glare of the spotlight, nothing at all to do with not being seen or heard or otherwise captured—something that would likely have been detrimental to his campaign, and surely impossible in any event. More…

9 November 2008

The night of the Iowa caucus, I wanted to quit my job and pack a bag for Chicago or New Hampshire or wherever the action was. I didn’t go to either of those places, and I put off my political wanderlust for an embarrassingly long 9 months, but I did end up where the action was. More…

6 November 2008

Early on Saturday morning, the weekend before Election Day, I drove down to Philadelphia with my old college buddy James to put in some get-out-the-vote work for the Obama campaign. James, a staff member for a union of service workers, was obligated to work long hours in a variety of grassroots campaign work. I had never done this before. More…